Housed in a Scottsdale Luxury Resort, This Vacation-Ready Guesthouse Awaits

Bernie Rodgers | November 28, 2020 |

Housed in a Scottsdale luxury resort, this vacation-ready guesthouse boasts an expansive floor plan that takes in the tranquility of nearby mountains and valleys.

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When homeowners Dimitri and Suzanne Haniotis envisioned their new guesthouse, they wanted the architectural design to convey an inviting, contemporary atmosphere. Situated between the nearby Camelback Mountains and Paradise Valley, the layout “creates an awareness of being hugged by the mountain,” according to Suzanne. This balance between the scenic surrounding desert and fresh interior was secured through an open floor plan that gives way to astounding views while still maintaining privacy for guests. As well as being harbored in stunning terrain, the guesthouse calls the luxury Sanctuary Camelback Mountain Resort and Spa (sanctuaryoncamelback.com) community home.

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When it came to the design, the couple tapped interior designer Lynne Beyer (lynnebeyer.com) to recreate the domestic oasis of their vacation cottage in Carmel, Calif. “They wanted any guest who would stay there to feel like this was their home away from home,” says Beyer. To accomplish this, she first needed to perfect the indoor color scheme, taking inspiration from the vibrant pieces the couple already owned. “I looked at it as a puzzle,” says Beyer. “The art options were large and created a distinct color palette that set the tone for each space.” The result is a blend of citron, black, white, gray, red and pink. The warm tones complement the mountains overlooking the property, especially as they are ignited each day at sunset. Beyer chose the client-owned black needlepoint chairs to offset the red walls in the guest room as not to visually overwhelm guests with too much color. Yet, during this design process, Beyer encountered a major obstacle: a national lockdown.

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The homeowners planned to begin furnishing March 1. Within weeks, borders were closed and most vendors would not ship. Beyer needed a plan—and needed it quick—so she turned to local retail and stocked sources. “With showrooms and some online sources being closed or most employees furloughed, I had to work very quickly to make the six-week time frame,” she says. “The resort wanted everything in place as soon as possible so they could put the guesthouse into the rental program.” Luckily, she accomplished this in time. It shows the degree of her expertise that she was able to pull off the entire design process during a national emergency. Not only did she meet the expectations of the Haniotises, but she surpassed them in style.



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Photography by: by Michael Baxter